Home | Product & Installation Articles | COMP Cams (page 2)

COMP Cams

Displacement vs Back Pressure

After installation of the turbo system on the larger 6.2L, the modified LS3 produced 807 HP and 747 lb-ft of torque. The peak boost pressure on the 6.2L was 6.9 psi, with a peak back pressure reading of 13.8 psi. Bigger motor equals more power equals more back pressure!

Words and Photos: Richard Holdener Unless you have been hiding under a rock for the last decade or two, the hottest thing going right now is the LS engine family. It is hard to believe that it was even possible to replace the original, and wildly successful, Small Block Chevy. After all, the original mouse motor was successful in just ... Read More »

Ford 306 Cam Swap

LEAD

Words And Photos: Richard Holdener Nostalgia is a funny thing. Case in point, the original muscle cars. Naturally, we fondly remember the hot muscle motors of the original muscle car era, but truth be told, are these memories tainted or otherwise artificially enhanced by nostalgia? As powerful as the original Mustang, Camaro, and Challenger motors were, the new ones are even ... Read More »

Top 10 Cam Failure Culprits

DSC_0793

Cams, cams, cams.. While camshafts can and do “go out,” something other than a bad core more often than not is to blame. Below are 10 things to think about before calling foul on your cam. COIL BIND Coil bind is when a spring compresses solid before or during full camshaft lift. This stack of metal stops the valve train ... Read More »

Low Buck DIY: LT1 Adjustable Cam Gear

We chucked up our trusty .350 bit and made our way through the metal, slotting the holes.

When upgrading our LT1 to an LS1-style ignition with the bolt-on kit from EFI Connection, we began installing our camshaft from COMP Cams with the factory cam gear. We found our Top Dead Center and then our Intake Lobe Centerline. To meet our desired 111 degree intake centerline, the cam core was ground at 115 degree lobe separation angle with ... Read More »

Finding the Intake Lobe Centerline

Step 3: Roll the cam backward until the gauge reads .50 lift before max lift and take a degree reading from the cam wheel.

Finding the Intake Lobe Centerline is essential to degree a camshaft, and it’s easy. See our Finding Top Dead Center article to learn how to set up the degree wheel. Read More »

Finding Top Dead Center

Step 4: Remove the piston stop and roll the engine back around until the pointer hits zero. This is your Top Dead Center.

Finding Top Dead Center on an engine is a four-step process made easy with a piston stop and a degree wheel.   Read More »

Sportsman Lifters: Tech, Durability and Affordability In One

Sportsman Solid Roller Lifters

There are plenty of lifters out there designed specifically for drag racing. Neither supply nor demand is a problem for these critical components. Cost and durability are. It’s easy to break your racing budget with a trick lifter, but as racers well know, the relationship between all components in a valve train package is more important than any individual part. ... Read More »

Global Horsepower: The Norway Firebird

norway firebird

Known for their high performance and stylish good looks, American cars are popular all over the world. Many cars have made their way across the seas and into the hands of proud new owners, like Roger Berkvik in Norway. When it came time to step up the horsepower in his beautiful black ’79 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, Bervik went back ... Read More »