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o2 sensor code, no start

Discussion in 'FAST Support Forum' started by waybad1, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Here's a good tip for cheaply cleaning the valves, pistons, and cylinders. Raise and rev the engine RPMs while only dribbling very small amounts of water into the throttle from a bottle. Done right, the engine will only stumble some, but the carbon on valves and in the cylinders will be caused to break up and burn off and out the exhaust. I only use the fuel additives for cleaning injectors. If you added water injection, you would have continuous cleaning action and no need for expensive boosters. Water injection uses cheap methanol based windshield washer fluid - about $3 a gallon. Water injection was good enough for WWII aircraft - and it still works great. The Booster additive people would prefer this was unknown. ;)
     
  2. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Your O2 sensor. If you used a non-sensor safe silicone while installing the intake or other engine gaskets, it will poison the sensor. Even handling the O2 sensor end can poison it. Some people have limited success cleaning them, but the reality is they never work right again after being poisoned. Even some boosters and other fuel additives will poison them - so it is imperative to make sure any fuel additive is rated O2 sensor safe.
     
  3. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I hate the 02. I had a problem early on and FAST warrantied it. I bought a new Bosch same part # because
    I was taking it out to Pismo and wanted a backup. The truck ran rich right of the get go. I sent the 02 back
    and used the FAST one. Same thing now. New Bosch same part #. Lasted 1/2 hour, back to the FAST one which by the
    way is much shorter. Time to spend the money and just buy the FAST one. I don't know if there is a compatibility
    issue. Maxwell gave the correct part numbers? Also both sensors Ebay. Maybe that's the issue.
    I remember back in the day my dad showed me the water trick on our 70 Ford station wagon 429. When I worked at
    GM they had an upper engine cleaner that you would start pouring slowly and then just dump it in and kill the motor
    after a soak. That stuff worked great but was taken off the market because of the chemicals. I think I am going to
    do the water dribble trick. I bet I will see the particals coming out the exhaust

    Oh, and I only use Permatex the right stuff. The best out there in my opinion
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
  4. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Loctite cures a little harder and was the first one to advertise as O2 sensor safe. Once Loctite is opened, it doesn't last as well in the tube as left over Permatex will. I use it and Permatex Ultra but always make sure they say O2 sensor safe on the tube.

    With that many sensors going bad, and each sensor only working a short while, it's a good bet something in your fuel or crankcase is killing your sensors. When fuel additive companies list their products as "off road use only", they usually will poison O2 sensors and/or poison catalytic converters - that's why they say "off road use only". I looked up the one you mentioned and, yup, it says "off road use only". The cheaper eBay sensors should work just as well as OEM if they have the correct listed replacement numbers.

    Banks makes a nice NA engine water injection kit that uses your FAST TBI TPS and MAP sensors to operate their injection system. Water injection won't poison O2 sensors. The Banks system is pricey ($600-$700), but accurate and worth the money in the long run.

    Maxwell knows his stuff. I doubt he would offer an incorrect part number.

    Yes, the water trick works - but don't kill the engine with it. If you kill the engine with water, you stand a chance of bending rods. Seafoam also works well.
     
  5. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I drove it more today. For sure the issue is fixed. Still tuning. The previous settings are for sure not
    correct for this manifold, but after about 20 miles on the freeway it is running better AL is now coming
    on. Timing is back to 20 before. It feels like like it needs to go more lean, but I will get it. Thanks A A
     
  6. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    You're welcome. There is one more thing that could be an issue preventing the mixture from leaning out. If your exhaust is short, you could be getting reversion pulses drawing air back up to to the O2 sensor from the end of the exhaust. Higher RPMs will alleviate this scenario, but low RPMs will allow the pulses to draw more air to the sensor. Better mufflers and longer exhaust pipes will eliminate this.
     
  7. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I have put about 50 miles on it and decided to pull some plugs. 2 pictures are of #4 and #2. 1 picture is of #7 that was wet on last inspection
    It is not at all wet today, but has a funky color. I put a new plug in that hole and it is running great. It actually looks like a deposit on the plug?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    And what I have been working on
     

    Attached Files:

    A A likes this.
  9. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    I'm 6'3", but I'd probably need a ladder to climb aboard. ;)
     
  10. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    It's hard to tell, but that could be some cylinder deposits burning off on the darkened plug (lower right). It could also be due to the anti-seize on the plug threads. You need to use extremely little anti-seize if any. NGK recommends not using any with their plugs. Have you been torqueing to 18 foot lbs.? The gaskets don't look compressed. Either of these things will affect the heat range. Overall, the plugs don't look bad.
     
  11. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I'm 6'2' and just launch myself up. I lay on the shock tower crossmember, still hard at 57. I did fail to mention that plug was
    not as tight as expected. The other plugs were tight. I did you too much anti-seize, I actually hate the stuff, it gets everyehere
    and is hard to wash off. I made sure this time that #7 was tight. I was actually relieved that it did not have and wetness this
    time. I put a new plug there with no anti-seize. I will check later.
     
  12. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    You may have had some cylinder fuel wash before - fresh oil will get rid of any dilution that might work its way back into the cylinders. I use 20w-40 synthetic after break-in. The synthetic gives a little better oil control in clearance engines (performance engines).

    Launch! These days I do well to just walk. Any launching I do is done seated behind the wheel - and not much of that. Although, I still drive like a younger man - I just don't get in and out of the seat like one. My '81 GMC sits at stock height, so I can reach most everything under the hood without climbing - and I don't need to step up to sit down in it (important to me now). I have to use a step bar to get in and out of my new Silverado. I didn't realize just how high the Silverado is until I parked the '85 TA next to it - and noticed the top of a front tire was higher than the fender of the TA. Your truck could probably drive right over my TA with no problem - maybe even my GMC.:)
     
  13. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I use Mobil 1 10/30. I actually smelled the oil yesterday and it had a fuel smell which makes sense. It was running rich so long
    I probably should change it even though it's new. I never thought about 20w-40 oil. My valvetrain tends to be noisy
    even when everything is adjusted properly. I think 40 would help. What brand? I have only used Castrol and Mobil 1
     
  14. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    I mostly use Mobil 1 synthetic purchased locally, and Royal Purple synthetic is reasonable from Summit. 20w-50 is also good. In the heat, with our higher horsepower, higher compression engines, I wouldn't use lower than 20w-40. Lighter weights are better for new close tolerance engine designs that maintain tight clearances - not our 1st gen Chevys.

    Yes, if your oil has a fuel smell it needs to be changed. It's time for me to change oil in the TA and the GMC - but neither of them has a fuel smell and the oil is still clean looking. I change it and filters every year despite under 2000 miles on the oil.

    You would be surprised at how little contamination will collapse roller lifters and make any lifter clatter. I don't take any chances with my oil, and I know first hand how much longer synthetic improves bearing life. I used to own a fleet of tractor trailers. When I switched to synthetic, service intervals became much longer - saving me a lot of cash. I had some trucks last a million miles on an in-frame after switching to synthetic - before oil consumption increased beyond 2-3 gallons in 3600 miles. I even switched to synthetic in the Road Ranger transmissions and 44,000 Eaton rears. Bearing and gear life there much improved also. In my trucks, I just used Delo 400 and bulk oil synthetic in the trans and rears. The synthetic also doesn't become acidic like sulfur and mineral oils do when mixed, and I was able to prevent destruction when drivers would have leaking rears topped off while on the road - before a repair could be made.

    The octane booster I use, when I use it, is Klotz - at about $10 a pint. 2 1/2 octane numbers at 1oz. to a gallon of gas. It's safe for sensors and cats, and 4oz. per gallon adds 10 numbers per Ron+Mon divided by 2. A pint to 16 gallons will clean the engine and stabilize the fuel.
     
  15. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    I have only used full synthetic on the last 2 motors in this truck. I had an oil pressure issue after some machining of my
    block. That machinist is long gone. it was like this. I had to remove my hv pump just to get the engine to stop leaking oil
    out the rear block plugs and oil pressure sender. Thus the lower weight. I had always run 20w-50 since the 70's


    Mike - This new oilsystem on a Motown block is different than a stock block.

    I ran oil restrictors drilled out to .110 and I had to use 5W-30. with my tight 383ci it had over 40 at 1200 rpm hot and pegged the meter at 80 at 6000+

    Now I'm running the new 5W-50 full syn Castrol in my 427ci

    My oil press at @200 degrees is 30 ish at idle and it climbs to 75 or so at over 6000 rpm

    Every motor is different. With solid rollers you want at least 30 psi at idle.

    use the weight oil you need [​IMG]
     
  16. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    Royal purple has 20w-50 here locally
     
  17. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Hmm. Well, I always used personally selected GM stock 4 bolt main cores. I use hydraulic roller lifters with roller cams and Roads lifters with hydraulic flat tappet cams. My bearings are always Clevite 77 and I watch clearances carefully. I use high volume, high pressure pumps, and staked screw-in oil galley plugs. All my 1st Gen Chevy engines idle with between 45 t0 60 lbs. of pressure depending on temperatures. My 6000 warm RPM pressures are regulated to 80 PSI. Every engine has a rev kit and windage tray. I also chamfer all my crank oil holes for more oil flow to bearings, and relief drill and polish my block oil returns for improved oil return to the pan. All of my engines always got full balancing.

    I use straight 30w oil for break-in and then switch to synthetic. If you don't break-in with non-synthetic, you risk crank seal leakage, un-seated ring to cylinder sealing, and incorrect initial bearing seat wear.

    My street stock engines all had stage two builds and none has ever failed but one. That one engine failed when a crazy driver dropped a gear, over revved it, and began lapping a dirt track at 8 grand. The car still won the race, and drove back onto the trailer - but with four rods through the block on the final of three laps at 8000. The car was already ahead of the field and would have won undamaged turning 6000. But, my driver decided he had to show off despite being told not to. I also never let him drive another car of mine.

    Even my non-race specific street engines got hand cut rings, KB hypereutectic pistons, or forged full floating pistons on stage two rods on stock crank cores. The reciprocating assemblies were shot peened for stress relief and checked for cracks before balancing. I always did most of my own machine work, and never entailed all of it to others. High standards of machine work are key to winning - and reliability. My drag race engines were a whole other level.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018
  18. waybad1

    waybad1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Location:
    Ventura CA
    The truck is still running great. The single plane improved everything about the way it runs. Idles better and smoother
    I did not notice any drop in the low end but the top end is much stronger. I also have much less fuel smell around the truck.
    It does quite the cam lope, but I think because it is running right
     
    A A likes this.
  19. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Great to hear! That's just as I expected! Even though TBI improves idle by design, you have a better idle and less fuel smell because torque improved with the better cylinder filling. Yes, your compression helps that lope. Sounds nice I'll bet! :D
     

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