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Rough running EZ EFI 1.0

Discussion in 'FAST Support Forum' started by Yadkin, Aug 23, 2016.

  1. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    That torque converter range is just what you need. Lol, that rear gear change will be a lot harder than getting the correct speedometer gears installed. Give the Fluidampr #720201 some thought if you aren't running one - they really do make a difference. Engine vibration is usually what you hear most at higher RPMs. Also, a bolt-on transmission tailshaft vibration damper might be of help. I can't recall well now, but I do think some of the AOD tailshaft housings had lower flanges that were drilled for them. They are a simple bolt-on.
     
  2. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
  3. Yadkin

    Yadkin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    Yadkin Valley, NC
    I'm currently running a Professional Products 90009. Apparently bigger isn't better.

    I remember that tailshaft damper on the '85 TBird that I used to own. I just wrote my contact at Monster Transmissions to see if he has one and can toss into the box.
     
  4. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    "I'm currently running a Professional Products 90009. Apparently bigger isn't better. " Good for torsional vibration, and larger size good for helping to hold engine RPM when shifting a manual transmission - added size of less use with an automatic due to the torque converter.

    The fluid balancers not only remove torsional stresses but give dynamic balancing providing less bearing and timing gear wear. You'll see big fluid dampers on large over the road diesel trucks as they perform so much better (and longer), and never shift to an out of balance condition unless physically damaged. There are race versions, and lower cost street versions for some engines. In your case, a street version (if available), is more than adequate.

    I think the tail housing dampener would be a good option to have if Monster Transmission can provide it. If your tail shaft housing has the flange for it, even one from a salvage yard might be a good idea - they aren't anything that will normally go bad.. I believe my '81 Thunderbird also had one. I certainly remember seeing them back in the day. They were also there to help prevent cracking of the tail housing.
     
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  5. Yadkin

    Yadkin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    Yadkin Valley, NC
    An update. I ordered the header coating material that you suggested but due to a very bust work schedule could not get to the job until last week. The material has separated in the container. Luckily I had some VersaChem exhaust system joint and crack sealer. That stuff has an extended shelf life, appears to be silica based and has worked very well for me in the past. In any event, my headers are sealed to the heads, finally. New tune and the engine runs great. Still only getting 14.5 mpg though.

    I still have a bit of driveline vibration. It occurs fairly consistently in 3rd gear and usually disappears in 4th. If I accelerate quickly to 4th it typically is present in 4th. I found a damper on ebay for a different car, a '67 Fairlane. https://www.ebay.com/itm/NOS-1967-FORD-FAIRLANE-REAR-AXLE-VIBRATION-DAMPER/351625360575

    [​IMG]

    Due to my custom H pipe location I think my best bet is to make one of these, using these approximate dimensions as a template then customizing for fit. This appears to be made of 1/8" plates, the two centers have the three bolt holes and then hold the multiple plates below the driveshaft U-joint. What is odd though in this photo is that there are two plates in the center, two on the close side and only one on the far side.

    Also, as I recall, my '85 Thunberbird had rubber in some of the plies, where this is all steel and riveted together. I'm not sure how to assemble the steel-rubber sandwich except to fasten together with bolts and nylon lock nuts.
     
    A A likes this.
  6. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Hey,

    Been a while - good you got the new transmission in. I don't recall rubber in the rear trans dampener, but bolts should work fine. You could stake a few threads to prevent the nuts loosening. 3rd gear vibration could also be the harmonic crank dampener - or even a slight driveshaft angle that needs correction. Just be sure it's not a wheel assembly.

    Yes, looks like you dropped 1 MPG with the new transmission. You will likely need a higher rear gear ratio to get that back. RPMs in 4th are a lot lower now - taking the engine out of its sweet spot.

    That ceramic stuff can go bad quickly. But, it works good if you can use it in time.

    I just built a new custom speaker box for my rear speakers in the GMC. Ready to install it tomorrow. It should give a lot more depth to my cab 6x9 Infinity KAPPA 693.11i speakers behind the seats - in combination with my Kenwood eXcelon XR400-4 digital amplifier. I've gotten the cab inside a lot quieter, so the Kenwood eXcelon KDC-X998 stereo is sounding even better.
     
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  7. Yadkin

    Yadkin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    Yadkin Valley, NC
    I went on ebay last night and purchased a rubber-iron differential damper off of a 2006 Jeep Commander. Instead of trying to mimic the outdated all steel design I'll use a 1/2" steel bar, flatten it out at the bolt ends, bend it to work around and over the H-pipe then weld a small plate to bolt this damper on it, just below the forward universal joint on the driveshaft.

    s-l1600 (2).jpg
     
  8. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Now that's "git 'er done" yankee ingenuity.;)
     
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  9. Yadkin

    Yadkin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    Yadkin Valley, NC
    *Thumbs Up*
     
  10. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    I just hope your project goes better than my new speaker box went. I had used a new tube of silicone sealant from Lowes that refused to harden. Had to take my box back apart, clean that mess up, and used automotive RTV this time. Finally finished the custom box, installed the Infinity 6x9's, and mounted the eXcelon amplifier in the open center area I built in for it. Just need to wire everything back up now. I was going to mount my FAST E6 in that same opening, but now I'm thinking I'll mount it where the factory speaker opening was just to the rear of the door - if I don't put it below the eXcelon amplifier. (The unsealed, un-insulated factory speaker area was also a big source of road noise) At least for now, I know the speakers will sound much better by just thumping the sealed box sections they now sit in - and I have sealed and insulated the factory speaker openings. I used 3/4 chipboard construction, and it even looks fairly good just painted black. The new custom seating hides the box anyway. From the factory, '81 GMC Sierra Classic came with a worthless stupid big cardboard tray below the rear window - talk about an upgrade for the GMC worthy of it's FAST F.I.!
     
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  11. Yadkin

    Yadkin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    Yadkin Valley, NC
    I prefer urethane over silicone for those type of projects. It performs much better as a glue, and its paint-able.

    I got some time earlier today to work on the bracket for the damper. Still waiting for the iron casting to come in. Here it is dry fit onto the tranny.

    Two bolts to dry fit, 1/2" rod bends around parking brake lever:

    1.jpg


    Bottom view:
    2.jpg


    Rear view. I have about 1/4" clearance between the driveshaft and the parking brake mechanism. The 1/2" bar goes between that and the H pipe for the exhaust:
    3.jpg
     
  12. A A

    A A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Yes, if I hadn't used black paint and black silicone, it probably wouldn't have looked very good. Later on, I intend to cover the box in either carpet or vinyl. I just used the silicone as an air tight sealer on assembly - the screws I used will never loosen.

    Your dampener looks good so far. Barring any metal stress problems, it should work fine. The Ford factory part used tempered steel leaves to help reduce stress.

    1/4 inch clearance is really close for the parking brake to driveshaft clearance. I would keep an eye on that.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018

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